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South Fellowship Church

Freeway

Freedom is Celebration

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It’s no coincidence that there was singing and dancing at the feast celebrating the son’s return. There is something about music that stirs the human soul. Over the past few years, one of our favorite songs as a community has been Boldly I Approach (The Art of Celebration) by Rend Collective. It’s a song that invites us to the freedom of the Father and gives us reason for celebration. The lyrics are below. Take some time today and read through them slowly… and then, take some time to celebrate the freedom you have in Christ.

“Boldly I Approach (The Art Of Celebration)”

By grace alone somehow I stand
Where even angels fear to tread
Invited by redeeming love
Before the throne of God above
He pulls me close with nail-scarred hands
Into His everlasting arms

When condemnation grips my heart
And Satan tempts me to despair
I hear the voice that scatters fear
The Great I Am the Lord is here
Oh praise the One who fights for me
And shields my soul eternally

Boldly I approach Your throne
Blameless now I’m running home
By Your blood I come
Welcomed as Your own
Into the arms of majesty

Behold the bright and risen Son
More beauty than this world has known
I’m face to face with Love Himself
His perfect spotless righteousness
A thousand years, a thousand tongues
Are not enough to sing His praise

Boldly I approach Your throne
Blameless now I’m running home
By Your blood I come
Welcomed as Your own
Into the arms of majesty

This is the art of celebration
Knowing we’re free from condemnation
Oh praise the One, praise the One
Who made an end to all my sin

Boldly I approach Your throne
Blameless now I’m running home
By Your blood I come
Welcomed as Your own
Into the arms of majesty

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By Ryan Paulson

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Freedom is Celebration2017-10-20T05:00:41-06:00

Freedom Fighter: Complaint | Philippians 2:14-15

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“Do all things without grumbling or disputing, that you may be blameless and innocent, children of God without blemish in the midst of a crooked and twisted generation, among whom you shine as lights in the world” Philippians 2:14-15

One of the best ways to learn a lesson from Scripture is to try to teach it to your kids. Last year we did a bit of Scripture memory with our girls and the passage above was one text we worked on. It seemed like a fitting text for a few little girls to learn. The only problem was, as I challenged them, I found myself grumbling and complaining all the time. I may not have used the same childish voice that they did, but what I was doing was still grumbling.

It’s easier said then done isn’t it? The story of the prodigal son ends with an interaction between the father and the older brother. We hear the frustrated grumbling tone in the older brother’s voice. I don’t know about you, but I can sympathize with the older brother at times. What his brother receives is totally unfair! That is until you hear the fathers response, “Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours (Luke 15:31).” This grumbling child already had what he wanted and didn’t even realize it. As the older son, he was the direct heir and already owned everything the father owned. In addition he had the father’s proximity.

What if it were easier not to grumble or dispute because we realized that the things we long for most are already ours? Our heavenly father does not withhold the best things from his children. Sometimes we may not agree with God on what is best for us, but that is a theological challenge for another day. The point here is this, as children of God we are fellow heirs with Jesus (Rom. 8:7) and have access to everything our deepest selves need. One of the best ways to combat a heart that grumbles or complains is to take the time to remember your blessings. Take a few minutes to simply list some of the things you are grateful for. If you want to grow in this further, I strongly recommend you read the book One Thousand Gifts by Ann Voskamp.[/vc_column_text][us_separator height=”25px” size=”custom”][vc_column_text]

By Aaron Bjorklund  

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Freedom Fighter: Complaint | Philippians 2:14-152017-10-19T05:00:14-06:00

Freedom Fighter: Duty | Luke 10:38-42

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38 Now as they went on their way, Jesus entered a village. And a woman named Martha welcomed him into her house. 39 And she had a sister called Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet and listened to his teaching. 40 But Martha was distracted with much serving. And she went up to him and said, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to serve alone? Tell her then to help me.” 41 But the Lord answered her, “Martha, Martha, you are anxious and troubled about many things,42 but one thing is necessary. Mary has chosen the good portion, which will not be taken away from her.”

Sometimes we go through life feeling just fine and then all-of-a-sudden it’s as if someone changed the rules of the game. Perhaps it’s a surprising health issue, betrayal from a friend, or a long season of waiting. Perhaps it’s a word from the Lord calling to light something we’ve never heard before. When we finally recognize our current reality is not working out well for us, life can begin to feel shaky, uncertain, infuriated even.

One crazy thing about walking with Jesus is that he sometimes throws us off balance or shakes us down to our core – whether he allows something to happen we never thought he would, or he reveals something we hoped he’d never expose.

When Jesus shakes things up, it’s for our good, because he sheds light on the mindset of our relationship with God. This was true for Martha and the Elder Brother. For Martha, typical life was filled with anxiety and trouble. When Jesus came for a visit, he spoke words that rocked her normal way of life. For the Elder Brother, life was going along just fine until his rebellious younger brother returns home disturbing his normal rhythms of work. Both stories expose truth within the person’s mindset. Martha and the Elder Brother were both focused on personal duty and control outside relationship with their Lord.

Everyone has a mindset and way they view God. Sometimes it’s only through confusion or losing control when we realize we’ve been trying to hold things together ourselves and developed false beliefs about God. Sometimes it’s only through Jesus “changing the rules” when we really get to experience his radical and reckless longing for us to sit, celebrate, and do life in his presence. Take a few moments today to admit where you’re trying to hold life together without God and stop to spend a half hour uninterrupted in the presence of God. [/vc_column_text][us_separator height=”25px” size=”custom”][vc_column_text]

By Yvonne Biel  

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Freedom Fighter: Duty | Luke 10:38-422017-10-18T05:00:00-06:00

Freedom Fighter: Anger | Galatians 5:16-21

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“16 But I say, walk by the Spirit, and you will not gratify the desires of the flesh. 17 For the desires of the flesh are against the Spirit, and the desires of the Spirit are against the flesh, for these are opposed to each other, to keep you from doing the things you want to do. 18 But if you are led by the Spirit, you are not under the law. 19 Now the works of the flesh are evident: sexual immorality, impurity, sensuality, 20 idolatry, sorcery, enmity, strife, jealousy, fits of anger, rivalries, dissensions, divisions, 21 envy, drunkenness, orgies, and things like these. I warn you, as I warned you before, that those who do such things will not inherit the kingdom of God.” (Galatians 5:16-21)

You can’t drop a frog into boiling water without it trying, with all its might, to jump out. But if you put it in the pan with cold water, you can boil it without it trying to escape. I’ve never had the desire to boil a frog, but it does make sense. The frog, with the gradual increase in temperature, doesn’t feel the danger it’s in until it’s too late. It’s boiled, and probably not suitable for eating, either.

There’s an interesting parallel to the frog in the story dealing with our life and walk with Christ. The list of sins we read above are like the boiling water, but rather than us boiling, we end up fettered to our sin, and no longer free in Christ. We find something interesting in the list, written as ‘fits of anger,’ ‘dissensions,’ and ‘divisions.’ We’re bound to run across one of these in our daily lives, perhaps prompted by someone cutting us off during our drive to work, or stepping in front of us at the grocery. Either way, we find we’re wearing the same old fetters like we were before Christ offered us freedom.

There’s no doubt we’re less than perfect, and some of these things are going to happen. But, rather than walking with Jesus wearing these binding freedom-stealing fetters, we can begin to notice what’s holding us back and seek the face of Jesus. Freedom is found in confessing them before we see the ground rushing up at us. Rather than showing that person on the drive to work that you think they’re number one, or demonstrating the height to which that vein on your forehead will rise, lift up a prayer for them. And, as you finish up reading this short note, perhaps an ‘enemy’ or two of yours that may have done something to make you mad comes to mind. Take a moment and lift them up to Jesus in a prayer of thankfulness and confess your sin to him. Then go on and continue your spiritual walk with Jesus fetter-free! [/vc_column_text][us_separator height=”25px” size=”custom”][vc_column_text]

By Rich Obrecht

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Freedom Fighter: Anger | Galatians 5:16-212017-10-17T05:00:51-06:00

Freedom is Relational | Luke 15:25-32

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[25] “Now his older son was in the field, and as he came and drew near to the house, he heard music and dancing. [26] And he called one of the servants and asked what these things meant. [27] And he said to him, ‘Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fattened calf, because he has received him back safe and sound.’ [28] But he was angry and refused to go in. His father came out and entreated him, [29] but he answered his father, ‘Look, these many years I have served you, and I never disobeyed your command, yet you never gave me a young goat, that I might celebrate with my friends. [30] But when this son of yours came, who has devoured your property with prostitutes, you killed the fattened calf for him!’ [31] And he said to him, ‘Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. [32] It was fitting to celebrate and be glad, for this your brother was dead, and is alive; he was lost, and is found.’”
(Luke 15:25-32)

The journey of Jesus’ story about the prodigal son culminates in a climactic party. The father gathers his entire village to celebrate the fact that his son is home – he was dead, and now he is alive. The picture Jesus paints is one of dancing, singing, and enjoying of the good things in life. It’s tactile and sensational. However, at its core, it is a snapshot of relationship. The son is reunited to his father in deep and abiding love. They are experiencing the fruit of a restored and renewed relationship. It’s a love that has not and will not let him go. It’s a love that allows for dancing. It’s a love that causes celebration. It’s a love that births new life.

This parable reminds us of something we all know – love is the context for freedom. In human relationships, when we know we are truly loved, we are free to be ourselves. We can make mistakes without fear of being cast aside – we can be ‘naked and unashamed.’ We know when love transcends performance, it creates freedom. The shackles of perfection and production are only broken under the weight of unconditional love. When the father runs towards his younger son – the same son who has blown 1/3 of his wealth – and wraps his arms around him, he creates a liberty in his soul that cannot be obtained in any other way. If you’ve ever heard someone utter the words, “I love you even though…” or “I’ll love you even if…” you know the sense of freedom the younger son felt.

The love of God is the cornerstone of the meta-narrative of scripture. The story begins with God in perfect relationship with humanity in a garden, and it ends with God in perfect relationship with humanity in the new creation. It’s this love humanity was designed to flourish within. It’s this relationship we all intuitively long for. As Saint Augustine so poignantly stated, “You have made us for yourself, O Lord, and our heart is restless until it rests in you.” We are most fully human when we are most abundantly loved. Being enveloped in the arms of God emancipates the human soul… it drives out fear and allows us to walk with God and others unhindered. (1 John 4:19)

Spend a few moments today and think about the way this reality has functioned in your earthly relationships. When have you experienced (given or received) unconditional love and what did it do to your soul? [/vc_column_text][us_separator height=”25px” size=”custom”][vc_column_text]

By Ryan Paulson  

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Freedom is Relational | Luke 15:25-322017-10-16T05:00:28-06:00

Killing the Calf | Luke 15:11-32

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11 And he said, “There was a man who had two sons. 12 And the younger of them said to his father, ‘Father, give me the share of property that is coming to me.’ And he divided his property between them. 13 Not many days later, the younger son gathered all he had and took a journey into a far country, and there he squandered his property in reckless living. 14 And when he had spent everything, a severe famine arose in that country, and he began to be in need. 15 So he went and hired himself out to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him into his fields to feed pigs. 16 And he was longing to be fed with the pods that the pigs ate, and no one gave him anything. 17 “But when he came to himself, he said, ‘How many of my father’s hired servants have more than enough bread, but I perish here with hunger! 18 I will arise and go to my father, and I will say to him, “Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you. 19 I am no longer worthy to be called your son. Treat me as one of your hired servants.”’ 20 And he arose and came to his father. But while he was still a long way off, his father saw him and felt compassion, and ran and embraced him and kissed him. 21 And the son said to him, ‘Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son.’ 22 But the father said to his servants, ‘Bring quickly the best robe, and put it on him, and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet. 23 And bring the fattened calf and kill it, and let us eat and celebrate. 24 For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found.’ And they began to celebrate. 25 “Now his older son was in the field, and as he came and drew near to the house, he heard music and dancing. 26 And he called one of the servants and asked what these things meant. 27 And he said to him, ‘Your brother has come, and your father has killed the fattened calf, because he has received him back safe and sound.’ 28 But he was angry and refused to go in. His father came out and entreated him, 29 but he answered his father, ‘Look, these many years I have served you, and I never disobeyed your command, yet you never gave me a young goat, that I might celebrate with my friends. 30 But when this son of yours came, who has devoured your property with prostitutes, you killed the fattened calf for him!’ 31 And he said to him, ‘Son, you are always with me, and all that is mine is yours. 32 It was fitting to celebrate and be glad, for this your brother was dead, and is alive; he was lost, and is found.’”

When all my daughters reached the age of 12, I took them to dinner. A date with my daughters at the start of the big change in their lives. During this dinner, I would talk with them about whatever topic came up. At some point in the conversation, however, I would focus in on my daughter, taking in their outward beauty that reflected their inward beauty, and tell them the most important thing for that evening, from me to them: “I love you no matter what.” I told them that there would be nothing they could do to change the love in my heart for them. They were my daughters, and I loved them.

In this story, we have no idea what the father told his sons when they were young. We don’t know what words were spoken to the boys to help them understand the bond the father had and wanted with them. But, I think in the story, we get a sense of what those words might have been.

This meandering son spoke to his father as though he were dead when he asked for his inheritance. His next act was to leave for a far country, where he partied like there was no tomorrow. Like Solomon, he tasted and experienced all the earthly pleasures he could find, until one day he opened his money purse and found it empty. Everything his dad had worked for, and given to him without complaint or sharp words, was gone. Spent. Wasted.

His story ends with him returning home, hoping to be a day-laborer for his dad, finding instead his dad loved him no matter what. He returned to relationship and covenant with his father, despite the choices he made. Dad calls for the fattened calf to be prepared as a meal, and the real party begins.

When the older brother returns from his work in the fields, he finds a party in full swing with the guests, and his brother, enjoying some prime beef. Having never received even a young goat to eat with his friends, he blows up at his father, with all the guests in full hearing. The father begins again to rebuild a gulf between them out of the sincere love he has for both sons, who equally failed their father in different ways. I have a sense that this father whispered to his sons over the years his deep love for them, never to change.

Likewise, God has whispered his love for us in a way that is unassailable: his son, the singular most valuable item in his eyes, was given up to slaughter so that we might be called his sons and daughters, too. Complete, total, unabashed and unfettered love for us is what God speaks to us. It’s an interesting thing we humans do, when we’re in the middle of a struggle. We look up and ask why God doesn’t care a whit for our circumstances and pain. What would be better in those times, rather than looking up and asking the question, would be to sit still, and recall all of the things God has done for us, and remember he’s never left our sides during our pain and struggles. Perhaps today is a good time, wherever you are, to do just that. [/vc_column_text][us_separator height=”25px” size=”custom”][vc_column_text]

By Rich Obrecht  

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Killing the Calf | Luke 15:11-322017-10-13T05:00:35-06:00

Filling the Shoe | Romans 8:12-17

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 “12 So then, brothers, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live according to the flesh. 13 For if you live according to the flesh you will die, but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live. 14 For all who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God. 15 For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, “Abba! Father!” 16 The Spirit himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God, 17 and if children, then heirs—heirs of God and fellow heirs with Christ, provided we suffer with him in order that we may also be glorified with him.” Romans 8:12-17

Jesus is so brilliant when he tells the story of the prodigal. Every detail is purposeful. When the foolish son returns with a strategic plan to be a slave – indebted to the one he offended – his father doesn’t even give him the chance to act like slave. He swoops in and says, “Bring quickly the best robe, and put it on him, and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet” (Luke 15:22). It appears this father lavishes his child with love as if the offense wasn’t even that big of a deal – it was forgiven already. He graciously welcomes him back into the family from head to toe.

In Galatians 4, Paul says, “God sent forth his Son… so that we might receive adoption as sons. And because [we] are sons… we are no longer slaves.” Slaves in this culture would have likely gone barefoot. Being fitted with shoes, the younger son is declared freed from any thought of slavery. Being fitted with shoes, this child is marked by acceptance and new responsibility. Paul goes on to say, “if a son, then an heir through God” (Galatians 4:7). Not only is the child freed from slavery, he’s reinstated into the inheritance once again.

There’s no doubt in the father’s mind that his boy is his son, but the son must accept this renewed relationship with his father and his community. He must receive the lavish grace and step in to fill the shoes once again – the shoes of sonship. Just like the younger son, many of us feel more like orphans – alone, rebellious, anxious, defensive, defeated or discouraged. We think we can fix ourselves or believe if only we could learn more, find that one missing piece, or tap into some inner peace of mind to fill up with joy. Unfortunately, searching for an abundant life within ourselves is a losing battle because true life is found in filling the shoes of sonship. Being a child of God becomes the source of our identity, purpose, and deep need for love.

Take a few moments to read these descriptions of an orphan. Check off the tendencies you recognize in yourself and take note of words or phrases that most apply to you. [/vc_column_text][us_separator height=”25px” size=”custom”][vc_column_text]

By Yvonne Biel  

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Filling the Shoe | Romans 8:12-172017-10-12T05:00:14-06:00

Signing the Check | 2 Corinthians 5:18-20

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2 Corinthians 5:18-20: 18 All this is from God, who through Christ reconciled us to himself and gave us the ministry of reconciliation; 19 that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation. 20 Therefore, we are ambassadors for Christ, God making his appeal through us. We implore you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God. 21 For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.

“You gave him what? After how poorly he spent his inheritance, you gave him access to the family bank account? What are you thinking?” I imagine this is what the older brother was thinking when he learned that the father had given his younger brother the family ring. As we continue to study through the story of the prodigal son, it is fitting for us to zoom in on the implications of the details we’re given in this story. When the father gives the younger son his ring, it is the ancient equivalent of handing him a checkbook to the family bank account. It was a sign of financial and business authority. Needless to say, that gesture demonstrates tremendous grace, but it is also an invitation to participate fully in the functions of the family.

As Christ followers, God does the same thing with us. When he places his spirit in us, he makes us ambassadors for Christ, as the passage says above. We receive authority and access to God’s resources in order to participate in the functions of God’s family. In 2 Corinthians, Paul tells us how we should use this authority. He says we have been given ‘the ministry of reconciliation.’

God’s grace towards us is not just a forgiveness of sin. It is an invitation to be a part of what our father is doing in the world. Even though we have squandered our lives in many ways by our sin, we are invited to join the Father in reconciling others into his family, just as we have been reconciled. Take a moment to pray this prayer based upon 2 Corinthians 3:4-6.

God help me to understand the confidence that I have through Christ toward you. Not that I am sufficient by myself to claim anything as coming from me, but that my sufficiency is from You. You made me sufficient to be a minister of a new covenant that you set up through Jesus. Thank you God for making me sufficient and teach me to live in that sufficiency as I live as a minister of that covenant for others.[/vc_column_text][us_separator height=”25px” size=”custom”][vc_column_text]

By Aaron Bjorklund  

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Signing the Check | 2 Corinthians 5:18-202017-10-11T05:00:18-06:00

Wearing the Coat | Isaiah 61:10

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Isaiah 61:10: I will greatly rejoice in the Lord; my soul shall exult in my God, for he has clothed me with the garments of salvation; he has covered me with the robe of righteousness, as a bridegroom decks himself like a priest with a beautiful headdress, and as a bride adorns herself with her jewels.

The fall season is my favorite. Many wonderful feelings are associated with this time of year for me. One of them, growing up and going back to school each September, meant a new outfit, a new winter coat and a new pair of shoes. As special as these clothes made me feel, it’s nothing compared to the incredible new wardrobe God has for us. As believers, we are the best dressed people, and we might not even be aware of all it means. Many times, we are admonished in Scripture to “lay aside” (Rom.6:6 -11, Eph.4:20, Phil.3:12-13, Col.3:6-9, Heb. 12:1, 1 Pet.2:1) and “put on” (Rom. 13:12, 1 Cor. 15:53, 2 Cor. 6:7, Gal. 3:27, Eph. 4:24,6:13, 1 Thess. 5:8, Rev. 19:14). The “taking off” and “putting on” of clothes becomes an experiential application of positional truth.

The rebellious son, who comes back home in his shame and humiliation in Luke 15, is immediately given a robe of his father’s. It marked the end of his old sinful self and the surrender of his will. The son allowed the coat to cover him, symbolizing the clean new life in relationship with his father. He was dead, but now is alive again. It heralded his sonship; he was not a slave. The robe gave him an honored position in the family. He was welcomed back home. It allowed him to stand in righteousness, giving him the reputation and character of his father in the future as he took his place in the family business. The father’s robe was an outward sign of the heart transformed.

The reality is, a robe has to be put on from the inside. A choice must be made to put it on. We have to want to “put on” the garments God the Father provides by Christ’s death on the cross. When we initiate the giving of ourselves to put on the clean, white, robe of righteousness, we will receive the incredible benefits of sonship and new life. It’s also a daily, continual choice to keep putting on Christ, and laying aside sin. Some people keep hiding pieces of their sinful rags in their pockets. They don’t want to let go of pride, anger, bitterness, lust and envy, etc. It’s easier to wear the old, and bow to temptations than to wear the garment of Christ and worship his Lordship. What do you want to wear today, the old sinful clothes or the bright new robe of your Father God’s in Christ? Read through Ephesians 6:10-20 and prayerfully put on each article. Linger on any piece as Christ leads you.

Ephesians 6:10-20:

10 Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. 11 Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil. 12 For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places. 13 Therefore take up the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand firm. 14 Stand therefore, having fastened on the belt of truth, and having put on the breastplate of righteousness, 15 and, as shoes for your feet, having put on the readiness given by the gospel of peace. 16 In all circumstances take up the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming darts of the evil one; 17 and take the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God, 18 praying at all times in the Spirit, with all prayer and supplication. To that end, keep alert with all perseverance, making supplication for all the saints, 19 and also for me, that words may be given to me in opening my mouth boldly to proclaim the mystery of the gospel, 20 for which I am an ambassador in chains, that I may declare it boldly, as I ought to speak. [/vc_column_text][us_separator height=”25px” size=”custom”][vc_column_text]

By Donna Burns  

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Wearing the Coat | Isaiah 61:102017-10-10T05:00:39-06:00

Breaking the Pot | 2 Corinthians 5:21

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2 Corinthians 5:21: “For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.”

The tradition was call Kezazah. Everyone in Jesus’ day would’ve been familiar with it and everyone would’ve been anticipating the way the story would end. When Jesus tells the parable about a son rejecting his father, the expected end would have been Kezazah. The word Kezazah literally means “cutting off.” If someone left the village, disgraced its inhabitants and then tried to come back, the villagers would take a clay pot, meet them on the road, and break the pot at their feet. It was their way of communicating, “You’ve broken the covenant and you are no longer welcomed here. Our relationship is over – it has been irreversibly shattered.” Everyone anticipated that Jesus’ story ending with Kezazah. But it doesn’t.

In Jesus’ parable, the father runs to meet the son on the road. He’s not carrying a pot; his hands are empty and his arms are extended offering embrace. I’ve often wondered if the father is watching and running to meet his son so that no one can get there before him to ‘defend his honor’ and enact the ceremony of Kezazah. This story turns the generally accepted perception of God on its head. God is not the angry, vindictive father punishing his son for his sin and breaking the pot declaring “unaccepted” or “unclean.” In this story, the father absorbs the shards of fractured relationship and endures the pain of rejected love. He’s taking the slap-in-the-face in order to offer the redemption his son needs. The father embraces a posture of disgrace to bring us back to his grace. The Apostle Paul echoed this truth in 2 Corinthians 5:21, “For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin, so that in him we might become the righteousness of God.”

The father’s embrace of the younger son is identical to God’s embrace of us. It’s “his kindness that leads us to repentance.” (Romans 2:4) It’s his mercy that draws us close. When God sees you and I coming home, he runs to meet us – not with a pot in hand, but with the open arms of grace. And we are called to imitate him. Every one of us carries ‘a pot.’ What are we going to do with it? When people wrong us, do we break the pot? When people hurt us, do we shatter our clay vessel? When people are our enemy, how do we respond? Our world is littered with the debris of broken pots, but Jesus is raising up an army of people with open arms rather than broken pots.

Today, take some time and read through Romans 8:1-2 – putting your name in the passage. Only when we recognized we’ve been accepted by the King, can we can hold out the King’s acceptance to our families, our workplaces, our neighborhoods, and his world. [/vc_column_text][us_separator height=”25px” size=”custom”][vc_column_text]

By Ryan Paulson

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Breaking the Pot | 2 Corinthians 5:212017-10-09T05:00:20-06:00
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